I’m an Artist

I rely on my instinctual inner self for inspiration and subject matter.

Why do I pursue art as a form of expression?

I will always remember the feeling of pure joy when I created my first image on the stone floor of our old farmhouse (or the ‘Old House’ as we called it during my teenage years) with charred sticks from the open fire when I was only about 3 or 4 years of age.

This is one of my earliest and fondest memories. In school I developed a growing curiosity whenever I came across pictures of paintings and would be constantly wondering how people were able to create these amazing pieces of art.

I decided to pursue my passion and creativity and I applied to the Sligo Institute of Technology, where I studied Fine Art for 4 years, which were some of the best years of my life.

Helen O'Sullivan Artist
Helen O'Sullivan Artist

A question that I used to ask myself when I was a student in college was ‘What is it that I would like to paint and be passionate about it?’

While, I was grateful to my teachers for showing me the various techniques of painting, use of colour and how to use my surrounding environment as starting points for subject matter, I always felt that something was missing.

It wasn’t until many years later, after having children, when I was returning to my creativity in art that I discovered that I was at a loss for subject matter. Nothing gave me passion to create and this realisation brought me to a standstill. With sheer frustration and agitation I began to doodle and scribble. After some time, images and shapes began to emerge from this process and it felt as if they were appearing by magic. It was then that I began to work instinctively.

Slowly it dawned on me that while my teachers in college were wonderful in teaching me how to paint and draw inspiration from my external landscape, nobody had told me about my ‘internal’ landscape and how to access it. For me this was unchartered territory. This revelation has led me to now rely on my instinctual inner self for inspiration and subject matter. The beauty about this is that it is forever changing and is also an adventure.

Helen O'Sullivan Artist

I would describe myself as a

Seabhean Artist

For many years I have been training with Amantha Murphy, (www.celticsouljourney.com) who is the founder of Women’s Academy of Irish Shamanism and Spirituality.
The teachings that I have learned from Amantha is called ‘The Woman’s Path of the Ancient Irish Mysteries’ which is the way of the ‘Seabhean’.

Through the creation of random doodles and scribbles images and shapes began to emerge and it felt as if they were appearing by magic. It was then that I began to work instinctively.

One aspect of these creations is the project of creating images of The Goddesses of the ‘Celtic Wheel’.

I know that for me I feel alive when I’m creating something with pencil, charcoal, watercolour, oils or acrylic and connecting with that. To see shapes emerge from a blank page or canvas is nothing short of exhilaration for me. This is why I create.

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This is The Goddess Aine and she reigns our mid Summer time. I have written a verse in honour of her.

Goddess Aine
Our Fairy Queen
How you sparkle
How you gleam
With your hand on your heart
Magic at your fingertips
Touching...Touching...
Bringing to life
The magic
That lays deep
Within us all.
... See MoreSee Less

This is The Goddess Aine and she reigns our mid Summer time. I have written a verse in honour of her.

Goddess Aine
Our Fairy Queen
How you sparkle
How you gleam
With your hand on your heart
Magic at your fingertips
Touching...Touching...
Bringing to life
The magic
That lays deep
Within us all.

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